Content about Chesapeake

09.15.11

By GREG MASTERS Capital News Service

ANNAPOLIS -- Biologists Andrew Watts and Alice Volpitta navigated the muddy, junk-strewn waters of the Chesapeake Bay, testing water quality and finding out just how much dirt and debris the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee dumped into the bay.

Stopping their small boat near the mouth of the Patapsco River recently, Watts and Volpitta, who work for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, tested water clarity by measuring the Secchi depth, or how deep a disk could be dropped before it disappeared.

09.02.11

By GREG MASTERS Capital News Service

ANNAPOLIS -- Most of Maryland's portion of the Chesapeake Bay will reopen to shellfish harvesting Sunday after a weeklong closure, but waters at the mouth of the Patapsco River will stay off limits due to a ruptured pipeline that continues to spew millions of gallons of waste into the river.

02.22.11

ANNAPOLIS -- Rockfish season will re-open for two days this month beginning on Friday.

04.20.10

By Ben Giles Maryland Newsline

SMITH ISLAND, Md. - Capt. Larry Laird ferries passengers and cargo to and from Smith Island twice a day, each time navigating the narrow channel that grants passage to his boat through the shallow Chesapeake Bay waters.

 A wrong turn to the left or right, and he’ll run his vessel aground.

04.07.10

By MORGAN GIBSON and JENNIFER HLAD Capital News Service Wednesday, April 7, 2010

ANNAPOLIS - Despite 25 years of restoration and protection efforts, the Chesapeake Bay's health is still bad and making only slight improvements, according to an assessment released Wednesday.

03.06.10

Frontline (PBS) Chesapeake Documentary

02.17.10

By MORGAN GIBSON Capital News Service Wednesday, February 17, 2010

WASHINGTON- "Snowpocalypse" removal methods won't hurt the Chesapeake Bay as they flow downstream, but spring showers are another matter, experts say.

The salt poured on snow-covered roads is not a problem for the brackish bay because it is a mixture of salt and fresh water. What hurts are the plastic bags, oil, animal manure, dirt and trash that flow into the Chesapeake every spring.

02.16.10

By JENNIFER HLAD Capital News Service Tuesday, February 16, 2010

ANNAPOLIS - Senate President Thomas V. "Mike" Miller Jr. said his bill to create a Chesapeake Conservation Corps accomplishes the second of the two most important legislative priorities this year: balancing the budget and creating jobs.

But Sen. Andy Harris, R-Baltimore County, says it fails at the first.

Miller, D-Calvert, touted his bill at a Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee hearing Tuesday, saying it is "about creating jobs for young people."

01.15.10

Out on the Chesapeake's Prospect Bay, blinding morning sunlight dances off the thick layer of ice that covers the freezing waters for as far as the eye can see. At the docks, local watermen are confined to dry land, their boats frozen in the ice. Then comes the Sandusky to the rescue. Throughout the eastern Chesapeake this week, the 80-foot, 120-ton, steel-hulled boat, was breaking ice and setting watermen free to do their business.

12.08.09

By CATHERINE KRIKSTAN Capital News Service Tuesday, December 8, 2009

ANNAPOLIS - A state program that aims to upgrade septic systems throughout Maryland, reducing the amount of nitrogen that failing systems can discharge into the Chesapeake Bay, has been met with overwhelming public demand -- and unexpected conflict.

Septic system vendors and installers throughout the state have threatened to abandon the Department of Environment's Onsite Sewer Disposal System program if the way their work is paid for isn't changed.

09.15.09

By CATHERINE KRIKSTAN Capital News Service Wednesday, September 16, 2009

ANNAPOLIS - For some, the recent wave of Chesapeake Bay restoration efforts has left out a crucial component of the watershed - watermen, who depend on the bay for their livelihoods, and who have suffered as it has declined.

Watermen are "fundamental to the Chesapeake Bay region's identity," said Tommy Landers, a policy advocate with Environment Maryland. The environmental advocacy group released a report Wednesday arguing that restoring the bay's ecosystem must include restoring the bay's communities.

09.08.09

By ALEKSANDRA ROBINSON Capital News Service Tuesday, September 8, 2009

WASHINGTON - Environmental activists pretended to build tiny wind turbines in the Hart Senate Office Building here Tuesday to call attention to clean energy legislation on the same day senators were set to return from their August recess.

"We're holding this creative demonstration to welcome the Senate back," said Anne Havemann, of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network, one of the organizations sponsoring the rally. Avaaz Climate Action Factory and the Energy Action Coalition also sponsored the event.