Content about Technology

09.07.11

Hurricane Irene brought destruction to the mid-Atlantic region, but it also had a positive impact on the Chesapeake Bay, stirring the waters and allowing oxygen into the vast dead zone that stretches from Baltimore to Virginia.

09.02.11

By GREG MASTERS Capital News Service

ANNAPOLIS -- Most of Maryland's portion of the Chesapeake Bay will reopen to shellfish harvesting Sunday after a weeklong closure, but waters at the mouth of the Patapsco River will stay off limits due to a ruptured pipeline that continues to spew millions of gallons of waste into the river.

04.12.11

A bill that would have imposed a two-year moratorium on natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale formation while an environmental impact study was completed stalled in the Senate this legislative session after easily passing the House.

01.13.11

By LAURA E. LEE Capital News Service Thursday, January 13, 2011

COLLEGE PARK - Local and state governments could see stormwater management fees from the federal government in "a matter of weeks," Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., said Thursday about a new law he co-sponsored.

11.05.10

By NICOLE DAO Capital News Service Friday, November 5, 2010

DEAL ISLAND - J.R. Gross, a veteran waterman, will drive two hours from his home on Monday to his boat in St. Jerome Creek to begin harvesting oysters off the shores of Southern Maryland.

10.14.10

By NICOLE DAO Capital News Service Friday, October 15, 2010

ANNAPOLIS - As a restoration scientist for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Rob Schnabel shuttles around Western Maryland in his hybrid car persuading farmers to switch to grazing -- which is healthier, eco-friendly and more profitable than confinement farming, where cows are kept in stalls and injected with antibiotics.

10.11.10

By LAURA L. THORNTON Capital News Service

WASHINGTON - Developers unveiled a $5 billion undersea transmission cable project Tuesday that could link a Maryland wind farm planned off the Worchester County coast to the mainland electric grid upon completion in 2020.

09.24.10
By LAURA L. THORNTON Capital News Service   WASHINGTON - Nitrogen and phosphorus continue to pollute waterways across the nation, according to a briefing by the United States Geological Society Friday.  
05.12.10

By JENNIFER HLAD Capital News Service

CAMBRIDGE - Two years after Maryland and Virginia implemented major restrictions on crab harvesting, the Chesapeake Bay's crab population has more than doubled. Now state officials hope an oyster hatchery, combined with new oyster sanctuaries, can help bring that population back from the brink.

04.20.10

By Ben Giles Maryland Newsline

SMITH ISLAND, Md. - Capt. Larry Laird ferries passengers and cargo to and from Smith Island twice a day, each time navigating the narrow channel that grants passage to his boat through the shallow Chesapeake Bay waters.

 A wrong turn to the left or right, and he’ll run his vessel aground.

04.16.10

By MORGAN GIBSON Capital News Service Thursday, April 15, 2010

WASHINGTON - Maryland's "difficult" decisions to improve the health of the Chesapeake Bay are beginning to pay off, the state's congressional delegation was told Thursday, but there's still a long way to go.

04.09.10

By MORGAN GIBSON Capital News Service Friday, April 9, 2010

CAMBRIDGE - Rep. Frank Kratovil is diving into a key issue in his district, hoping to learn more about Chesapeake Bay oysters and efforts to save them.

Kratovil, D-Stevensville, went out on the Choptank River late Friday morning with some of Maryland's watermen and environmental scientists to watch how they study and restore oysters.

04.07.10

By MORGAN GIBSON and JENNIFER HLAD Capital News Service Wednesday, April 7, 2010

ANNAPOLIS - Despite 25 years of restoration and protection efforts, the Chesapeake Bay's health is still bad and making only slight improvements, according to an assessment released Wednesday.

03.31.10

By MORGAN GIBSON Capital News Service Wednesday, March 31, 2010

WASHINGTON - Maryland environmental groups were outraged over President Obama's announcement Wednesday lifting the 20-year ban on offshore drilling, saying the move could have disastrous effects on the Chesapeake Bay.

03.30.10

By JENNIFER HLAD Capital News Service Tuesday, March 30, 2010

ANNAPOLIS - Maryland fishermen say new federal regulations on sea scallops benefit large fishing companies in New England -- and put small boats out of business.

03.23.10

By JENNIFER HLAD Capital News Service Tuesday, March 23, 2010

ANNAPOLIS - A bill filed late in the House of Delegates would require the Department of Natural Resources to establish oyster sanctuaries in half of the viable habitat and create a more specific fishery management plan for oysters -- and place a moratorium on oyster harvesting until those goals are met.

03.12.10

By JENNIFER HLAD Capital News Service Friday, March 12, 2010

ANNAPOLIS - For 20 years, Roy Rafter made his living as a waterman, catching fish, crabs and oysters. Now, Rafter spends hours in a dark boat, working to catch poachers.

"It's kind of like fishing. Sometimes you catch them, sometimes you don't," said Rafter, a Natural Resources Police corporal, as he finished up a predawn patrol of the Chesapeake Bay Wednesday morning.

03.09.10

By JENNIFER HLAD Capital News Service Tuesday, March 9, 2010

ANNAPOLIS - Watermen converged on the State House on Tuesday to voice their support for bills that would drastically diminish the Department of Natural Resources' ability to regulate oyster harvesting.

03.05.10

By JENNIFER HLAD Capital News Service Friday, March 5, 2010

ANNAPOLIS - The chairman of Perdue Farms called a lawsuit against one of the company's contract farms "one of the largest threats to the family farm in the last 50 years," and asked Maryland's Eastern Shore delegation to help.

02.26.10

By JENNIFER HLAD Capital News Service Friday, February 26, 2010

ANNAPOLIS - About 40 Eastern Shore chicken houses collapsed under the weight of the recent snow, and now the Maryland Department of the Environment is giving farmers the option to burn the wood debris instead of hauling it to the landfill.

02.17.10

By MORGAN GIBSON Capital News Service Wednesday, February 17, 2010

WASHINGTON- "Snowpocalypse" removal methods won't hurt the Chesapeake Bay as they flow downstream, but spring showers are another matter, experts say.

The salt poured on snow-covered roads is not a problem for the brackish bay because it is a mixture of salt and fresh water. What hurts are the plastic bags, oil, animal manure, dirt and trash that flow into the Chesapeake every spring.

02.02.10

By JENNIFER HLAD Capital News Service Tuesday, February 2, 2010

ANNAPOLIS - Child and family advocates, nurses, environmental organizations and business representatives Tuesday urged a Maryland House committee to support a bill banning a common chemical from infant and children's products.

The bill would prohibit the manufacture, sale or distribution of products containing bisphenol-A, for children younger than 4.

01.28.10

By JENNIFER HLAD Capital News Service Thursday, January 28, 2010

ANNAPOLIS - Raymond Combs and his family have been trying to get permits to raise oysters for the last three years.

They started growing a few oysters in a tributary near their home in Hollywood and would eventually like to have at least a 5-acre aquaculture site. But their plan stalled when they learned that just applying for an aquaculture permit is $750, and the application and impact fees could total $90,000.