Content about Washington

10.12.10

By LAURA L. THORNTON Capital News Service

WASHINGTON - Developers unveiled a $5 billion undersea transmission cable project Tuesday that could link a Maryland wind farm planned off the Worchester County coast to the mainland electric grid upon completion in 2020.

09.24.10
By LAURA L. THORNTON Capital News Service   WASHINGTON - Nitrogen and phosphorus continue to pollute waterways across the nation, according to a briefing by the United States Geological Society Friday.  
04.16.10

By MORGAN GIBSON Capital News Service Thursday, April 15, 2010

WASHINGTON - Maryland's "difficult" decisions to improve the health of the Chesapeake Bay are beginning to pay off, the state's congressional delegation was told Thursday, but there's still a long way to go.

04.16.10

By MORGAN GIBSON Capital News Service Thursday, April 15, 2010

WASHINGTON - Maryland's "difficult" decisions to improve the health of the Chesapeake Bay are beginning to pay off, the state's congressional delegation was told Thursday, but there's still a long way to go.

04.01.10

By ADAM KERLIN Capital News Service Thursday, April 1, 2010

ANNAPOLIS - New federal rules expediting stiffer mileage requirements for cars and trucks were finalized in Washington Thursday in an effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and dependency on foreign oil.

03.31.10

By MORGAN GIBSON Capital News Service Wednesday, March 31, 2010

WASHINGTON - Maryland environmental groups were outraged over President Obama's announcement Wednesday lifting the 20-year ban on offshore drilling, saying the move could have disastrous effects on the Chesapeake Bay.

03.31.10

By MORGAN GIBSON Capital News Service Wednesday, March 31, 2010

WASHINGTON - Maryland environmental groups were outraged over President Obama's announcement Wednesday lifting the 20-year ban on offshore drilling, saying the move could have disastrous effects on the Chesapeake Bay.

02.17.10

By MORGAN GIBSON Capital News Service Wednesday, February 17, 2010

WASHINGTON- "Snowpocalypse" removal methods won't hurt the Chesapeake Bay as they flow downstream, but spring showers are another matter, experts say.

The salt poured on snow-covered roads is not a problem for the brackish bay because it is a mixture of salt and fresh water. What hurts are the plastic bags, oil, animal manure, dirt and trash that flow into the Chesapeake every spring.

01.26.10

By ALEITA JOHNSON Maryland Newsline Tuesday, January 26, 2010; video added Feb. 2, 2010

WHEATON, Md. - For more than a decade, the men and women of Ship’s Company Chanteymen have been carrying on a boisterous tradition: leading open sings in Wheaton, Baltimore, Annapolis and Washington, D.C., in which they belt out work songs written by and about sailors.

Their goal: to preserve maritime culture and give folks an opportunity to raise their voices - and glasses - in celebration.

12.02.09

By DAVID M. JOHNSON Capital News Service Wednesday, December 2, 2009

WASHINGTON - Micro-finance institutions that serve an estimated half billion of the world's poor could be in a unique position to prepare developing countries for climate change, according to a report by one St. Mary's College professor.

As President Obama and other world leaders visit Copenhagen for the United Nations Climate Summit next week, economics professor Asif Dowla, hopes poorer nations and their people will be kept in mind when decisions are made.

11.24.09

By ALEKSANDRA ROBINSON Capital News Service Tuesday, November 24, 2009

EDMONSTON - This tiny town of 1,500, is soon to join the ranks of the country's environmentally elite -- towns like Seattle and Portland -- with the reconstruction of Decatur Street into a new green street.

11.13.09

By SHARMINA MANANDHAR Capital News Service Friday, November 13, 2009

WASHINGTON - Norma Hooks described laying her sister, Leona Miller, to rest in the Chesapeake Bay as a "wonderful experience."

Miller's cremated remains, combined with an environmentally safe cement mixture, were cast as an artificial "memorial" reef and personalized with Miller's "jewelry and knickknacks," said Hooks, 64, a Finksburg resident.

11.12.09

By DAVID M. JOHNSON Capital News Service Thursday, November 12, 2009

WASHINGTON - The world economy has reached a dangerous twilight at the end of the fossil fuel era, and urgently needs to change its energy sources, said Jeremy Rifkin, president of the Foundation on Economic Trends in Bethesda.

Businesses, however, can turn that impending disaster into opportunity by investing in green energy solutions.

11.06.09

By ALEKSANDRA ROBINSON Capital News Service Friday, November 6, 2009

WASHINGTON - The parking lots of Queen Anne's County's Bloomfield Farm will soon be modeling the latest in a series of efforts by the county to battle stormwater runoff pollution in the Chesapeake Bay.

11.04.09

By TINA IRGANG Capital News Service Wednesday, November 4, 2009

WASHINGTON - Republican Robert McDonnell's win Tuesday in the Virginia gubernatorial elections could roll back gains in that state's cooperation with Maryland on the Chesapeake Bay and other policy issues, experts warned Wednesday.

Outgoing Democratic Gov. Timothy Kaine has had "a very cooperative, positive relationship" with Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley, said Mark Rozell, a professor of public policy at Virginia's George Mason University.

11.03.09

By CATHERINE KRIKSTAN Capital News Service Tuesday, November 3, 2009

ANNAPOLIS - A significant portion of the state's land is vulnerable to residential development, which might hinder land preservation goals, said an official with the Department of Planning at a special joint committee hearing Tuesday.

Large swaths of Maryland, particularly in rural areas and along the Baltimore-Washington corridor, are suffering from development pressure, said Joe Tassone, director of the planning department's office of Land and Water Resource Planning.

10.30.09

By ALEKSANDRA ROBINSON Capital News Service Friday, October 30, 2009

WASHINGTON - The Chesapeake Bay is slated to get $50 million in funding thanks to an appropriations bill that passed the Senate last night and awaits President Obama's signature.

10.14.09

By ALEKSANDRA ROBINSON Capital News Service Wednesday, October 14, 2009

WASHINGTON - The head of the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments Wednesday implored Maryland Democratic Sen. Ben Cardin not to set local governments up for failure with his new Chesapeake Bay bill.

09.25.09

When John Smith traveled the bay 400 years ago, he wrote that oysters, "lay as thick as stones," and that sturgeon were plentiful -- "more than could be devoured by dog or man."

09.17.09

By ALEKSANDRA ROBINSON Capital News Service Thursday, September 17, 2009

WASHINGTON - Algae blooms and dead zones in America's waterways -- including the Chesapeake Bay -- represent a significant health risk for Americans, as well as a threat to the nation's economy, said Robert Magnien, director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Silver Spring-based Center for Sponsored Coastal Ocean Research.

09.08.09

By ALEKSANDRA ROBINSON Capital News Service Tuesday, September 8, 2009

WASHINGTON - Environmental activists pretended to build tiny wind turbines in the Hart Senate Office Building here Tuesday to call attention to clean energy legislation on the same day senators were set to return from their August recess.

"We're holding this creative demonstration to welcome the Senate back," said Anne Havemann, of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network, one of the organizations sponsoring the rally. Avaaz Climate Action Factory and the Energy Action Coalition also sponsored the event.